Review: Montane Prism gloves

Review: Montane Prism gloves 

Gloves are something I always find difficult to get on with when out on the hills, particularly in winter. My hands are either too hot or too cold or I can’t get them on when my hands are cold and damp. I have bought so many pairs that end up in the back of the cupboard after only one use.

I already have the Montane Prism jacket and trousers, so when I found out Montane  added gloves to the Prism range, I was instantly interested. My friend let me try on his pair, and I decided pretty much there and then to invest in a pair.

My friend’s pair were size large and I found them just a bit big for my small hands, I did think about the cold days where you sometimes fight with your gloves to get them on, but I opted for size medium in end because there was still plenty of space inside the glove once on my hands.

Gloves on
Gloves on

These gloves also appealed to me because of the small stuff sack they come with. Once packed away, they are not much bigger than a kiwi fruit and weigh in at 68 grams.

On the scales
On the scales

Saturday just passed, the first snow of the 2015-16 winter season had fallen on the Scottish hills and I had a couple of Corbett’s down Loch Rannoch lined up. It was fairly windy and the car thermometer was reading 5ΒΊC.

As usual, you’re always a bit cold to start off with so I put on the Prism gloves from the but naturally my hands got too warm so I put them away until I got further up. My hands began to get a bit cold again as the wind hit, so I put them back on. We headed up a steep section covered in snow, my hands were on the ground quite a bit and the gloves stood up well against the cold wet snow.

On arriving at the summit, we were met with a chilling wind (25-30mph approx), but my hands were still warm and toasty until I took them off to take some photographs. I put them back on immediately afterwards and it didn’t take long to warm up again with the nice soft lining inside the gloves.

The gloves stayed on pretty much until I got back to the car. But when stopping to use my phone, I was impressed that I was able to take a photo without removing the gloves. So this is another added bonus.

Whilst I will encounter colder days on the hill , I felt the Prism gloves stood up well to the chilly conditions on the summit and when I had my hands down in the snow the outside of the gloves were wet, but I never once my hands felt wet inside. So I would trust these gloves, in all but the coldest of conditions. In fact, for what the gloves weigh, I’ll probably have these in my pack all year round.

1 year on…

When I initially published this review, some readers feared that they may wear out quickly. I have now had these gloves for around a year and they’re wearing well. I’ve used them all year round in some pretty cold conditions and I haven’t needed to bring out the heavy duty gloves. These gloves continue to be my first choice glove into 2017.

2015-11-16 15.02.12

Price: Β£35 (RRP)

Weight: 68 grams (Size M & includes stuff sack)

Material: Primaloft & Pertex Microlight

Score: 5 of 5

For: Small packable gloves with excellent warmth to weight ratio.

Against: Nothing so far.

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4 thoughts on “Review: Montane Prism gloves

  1. Mark

    I’ve tried numerous makes of waterproof gloves and mittens. My main issue, at almost any time of year, is that I overheat and my hands sweat. I’ve never found any glove with a membrane that can deal with this. After decades tramping the hills in all weathers I’ve gone back to the old style Dachstein mittens. Okay they do get wet and need wringing out periodically but I’m reconciled to that.

    1. I’ve never seen or used a pair of Dachstein mittens. But heard they’re great in seriously cold conditions.

      Gloves are definitely an area that I’ve never been totally happy with. But I do think the Prisms will fill a gap.

  2. I’m the opposite to Mark but like the same gloves – Dachsteins for me (when I can get some). I can only really keep my hands warm in wool (or wool mix/thinsulate) and need a mitten as I have Reynauds and, if I get my hands cold, I pass out! 😦

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